Tag Archives: Worldwide Indigenous Science Network

Makua’s WISN Vision

WORLD INDIGENOUS SCIENCE NETWORK

Greetings return to you, in the love and in the light of the ancestors, The Source of Life.

Aloha Kakou!

Members of the World Indigenous Science Network are gathered from all branches of human enterprise, of which organized religion is only one. There are scientists who, repudiating violently the unproven, yet are giving all they have of scientific ability and knowledge to the service of humanity- each in his chosen scientific field; there are men of financial stature, who regard money as a responsibility to be dispensed wisely in the service of others, yet the mystical or occult terminology may mean nothing whatsoever to them.

There are educators, preoccupied with wise formulations of knowledge and with an encyclopedic understanding of garnered wisdom of the ages which they seek to utilize in fitting the younger generation to live beautifully, constructively and creatively; there are churchmen and religious leaders who are not tied or handicapped by the form; the spirit of light is in them, and they intelligently love their fellow men. All of these people, if they are members of the World Indigenous Science Network, must inevitably be reflecting thinkers, must have creative objectives, must be truly intelligent, and must have added expanding love to their intelligence.

These men and women have a dual relationship: to the rest of humanity whom they seek to serve, and also to the Hierarchy, via some malae, a sacred gathering place, – which is the source of their inspiration and of their creative efforts to think and to work.

This spirit of goodwill is present in millions, and it evokes a sense of responsibility. This is the first indication  in the race that man is divine. It is upon this steadily growing goodwill that the World Indigenous Science Network is counting, and which it is their intention to utilize. It is found in the collaboration of every group which exists for world betterment, and constitutes an unused power which has never yet been organized into a whole, as the loyalty and effort of the individual man of goodwill has hitherto been given to his organization or endeavor. It is the intention of the World Indigenous Science Network not to interfere with this loyalty or to arrest any activity, but to gather into one organized whole all these people, without creating a new organization or sidetracking any of them from the work they have already undertaken.

The World Indigenous Science Network is already a functioning, active group. Every man and woman in every country in both hemispheres, who is working to heal the breaches between people, to evoke the sense of brotherhood, to foster the sense of mutual interrelation, and who sees no racial, national or religious barriers, is a collaborator of WISN, even if he has never heard of it in these terms.

The members of WISN are not a band of impractical mystics. They know exactly what they seek to do, and their plans are laid in such a manner that- without upsetting any existing situation- they are discovering and bringing together the men of goodwill all over the world. Their united demand is that these men of goodwill should stand together in complete understanding, and thus constitute a slowly growing body of people whose interest is shown on behalf of humanity of people whose interest is shown on behalf of humanity and not primarily on behalf of their own immediate environment.

The larger interest will not, however, prevent them from being good citizens of the country where their destiny has cast them. They will conform to and accept the situation in which they find themselves, but will (in that situation and under the government or religious order) work for goodwill, for the breaking down of barriers, and for world peace. They will avoid all attack of existing regimes and personalities; they will keep the laws of the land in which they have to live, but they will cultivate the spirit of non-hatred, utilizing every opportunity to emphasize the brotherhood of nations, the unity of faith, and our economic interdependence. They will endeavor to speak no word and do no act which can separate the breed dislike.

It is of value to reiterate at this point that WISN is not an organization. It has no headquarters, but only units of service throughout the world; it has no president or list of officers; it has only servers, who are occupied simply with the task of discovering the men and women of goodwill. This is the immediate task. These men and women of goodwill must be found and trained in the doctrine of non-separateness, and educated in the principles of cooperation and characteristics of the new social order, which is essentially a subjective re-alignment, resulting in pronounced changes brought about through the weight of a world opinion, based on goodwill which knows no barriers or religious differences.

Loosely knit together by mutual understanding and similarity of objective, the members of WISN stand, whether they are conscious or unconscious of each other or the group, as it is here described. In every country they are found and actively are working. Through them the men and women of goodwill are being discovered. Their names and addresses are being noted and collected into mailing lists. Their capacity, whatever it may be, to serve their fellow men and women, will be also noted when possible, and utilized if desired.

Thus through the men and women of goodwill everywhere, the principle of goodwill can be nurtured and developed in every country, and eventually turned to practical use. These people will constitute a new body of practical thinkers in every nation, who will be no menace to any government, nor will they work against the established order. They will throw themselves into those movements and undertake those activities which can in no way foster hatred, spread enmity, or cause division among their fellow men and women. To this group of WISN, no government or church can object.

Therefore, the echoes of the ancestors is complete for now, and I leave you, in the love and in the light of the ancestors, The Source of Life; rejoicing in the power and the peace braided with the cords of patience, revealing the tapestry of the most powerful force in the universe, your love.

Sincerely in service

Hale Makua

Hono Ele Makua

12 October 2002 Letter: WISN Elders’ Council

Dr. Apela Colorado

272-2 Pualai St.

Lahaina, Maui, HI.

96761

12 Oct. 2002

Greetings return to you, Dr. Colorado, in the love and in the light of the ancestors, The Source of Life.

Aloha Kakou!

The first WISN international indigenous spiritual Elders and peoples conference was convened on the 29th of September 2002. Participants included indigenous peoples from Glastonbury, Avalon, England, Louisiana, USA; Wisconsin, USA; Hawai’i, USA; France, Italy, Washington D.C., USA; and London, England.

The conference was called to share experiences and common problems, and investigate the formation of a unified body of indigenous elders to promote unity and co-operation amongst indigenous peoples and organizations, to articulate the concerns of our people at an international level, to promote universal recognition and respect for indigenous forms of spirituality, and promote the ideas of peace, respect, compassion, equality and understanding amongst all members of the human family. It was concluded that a further conference be convened on the 28th of January 2003 to:

a) establish the international indigenous spiritual elders council.

b) hear formal submissions regarding human rights violations on indigenous peoples.

c) facilitate on going dialogue encouraging information sharing and developing collective programmes promoting self determination, cultural advancement and environmental protection initiatives between indigenous peoples, states, and international organizations.

d) celebrate through song, dance, chants, art, etc. the world indigenous people.

The echo of the ancestors have been sounded, therefore, I leave all the elders council and Dr. Colorado, in the love and in the light of the ancestors, The Source of Life; rejoicing in the power and the peace braided with the cords of patience, revealing the tapestry of the most powerful force in the universe, your love.

Sincerely in service,

Makua

The Art of Human Navigation

Wayfinding
The Art of Human Navigation
“For the earth is ocean. And rising everywhere in it are islands. Go find the islands…”
From An Ocean in Mind.

Karen Chandler

Such was Nature’s strong, persistent message for ancient Polynesian voyagers and native tribes of the Pacific Northwest Islands. Written in the stars, on flotsam, and in bird migration paths, came word of distant, undiscovered islands. Called seaward beyond the horizon clouds, native peoples of the Pacific Rim did indeed find islands scattered throughout a sea spanning half the surface area of the earth. Out they went and back they came, home again to Samoa and Tahiti, to the Prince of Wales and the Queen Charlotte Islands. How? asked western navigators centuries ago. Skillfully, the legends tell us, consistently tracking nature’s guideposts.
Without instruments navigation was a human act. The map was in the mind of the wayfinder, whose whole being had been trained and opened by chants, long hours of observation and elder’s patient teachings. He or she learned to recognize and interpret nature’s clues to judge direction, distance traveled, time and final landfall. Under sail in a circle of sea and sky, memory, awareness and the physical senses formed part of a dead reckoning system linked to ocean, atmosphere and sealife
Wayfinding was a well-developed art according to Will Kyselka, astronomer and author of a book on Polynesian wayfinding. For hi it was as precise as math and logic, with the magic of ritual and intuition. For Native American and social scientist, Dr. Pamela Colorado,founder of the Indigenous Science Network, it was and is, science in the full meaning of the word, “a holistic way of knowing nature, fully human, aligned with self, nature, and spirit.” It is proof, according to her and cultural anthropologists, of the intentional peopling of the Pacific through exploration, trans-Pacific gatherings and established trade routes.
For the ancient navigator apprenticed to the sea, wayfinding was a way of life embedded in his being. It was part of a culture that still watches, rearing seamen as meticulous observers of natural phenomena. These new wayfinders, schooled in modern astronomy and experienced in ways of the sea, are learning to trust their senses and their minds once again on a journey in search of the ancient mind. Their goal is to sense and feel their way back into harmony with nature, a state of being so needed, many claim, in a high-tech western culture trained to dominate, not cooperate, with nature.
Each ocean voyage began with two points on the navigator’s reference course. “You knew where you started, and where you wanted to go,” says Hawaiian steersman Na’ilima. He recently returned from a wayfinding voyage to Tahiti on the Hokule’a, a modern replica of an ancient sailing canoe. “Between home and that distant island may lay thousands of miles of open sea,” he says. “It did for us.” It did, no doubt, for the Haidas people of Prince of Wales Island. They sailed, Dr. Colorado tells us, to Japan and back. Along such a route, everything had meaning: ocean swells, the color and shape of the clouds, currents, and the pitch and roll of the canoe.
“Native sailors knew what to expect,” says Dr. Colorado. “They knew the wind and sea conditions all along the way from chants, personal accounts, and petroglyphs, or symbolic rock drawings.” According to her research, Indians of the northwest Pacific coast may have planned their trips using star maps and tidal clocks written in the changing pattern of tideline rocks.
Navigators, like the Nootka women of Vancouver Island, had songs and special rhythms keyed to the surface movements of the sea. “Everything we ever knew about the movement of the sea was preserved in the verse of that song,” writes Anne Cameron, quoting an elder in her historical novel on Nootka tribal history. “There was a song for goin’ to China and a song for goin’ to Japan. All she (the steerswoman) had to know was the song and she knew where she was.”
“We had the rising sun and the swells to steer by too,” says Na’ilima. “Like other wayfinders, we also knew where reference islands lay along our path. And most of all, we had the stars. They showed the way.”
According to Na’ilima and others, navigators set their course, their time, their latitude,and their distance traveled by the night sky. Each target island has its guiding stars, points along the margin of an imagined compass that was studded with other well known lights. In the center sat the wayfinder, watching and memorizing the patterns. The steersman nosed the “compass needle” along a predetermined path of successively rising or setting stars. In the mind’s eye of the crew, the sea and reference islands flowed past a stationary canoe, from beneath one star position to another. Synchronous pairs of rising or setting stars, charted just above the horizon, told latitude. Other stars at zenith marked the location of target islands like Tahiti and Hawaii.
At dawn the navigator read direction in the swells against the pattern of the morning sky. “We always knew where north was–our reference point for daytime steering,” Na’ilima explains. It was never more than a few handwidths away from a sun that rose just north and south of east.”
Wayfinding was very effective but less precise during the day. It required more clues and more concentration to assimilate and process them. But the swells were always there, and seasonal trade winds blew in consistent patterns written in the color and shape of horizon clouds. The wayfinder could estimate speed from the sound and feel of the canoe and determine currents from the shape and direction of waves. At times he or she just knew the direction to set–with or without external clues–drawing upon intuition, perhaps, or a subtle communion with the sea itself that was the essential mark of a seasoned wayfinder.
The final destination lay to windward of the reference track, surrounded by what Kyselka calls “concentric circles of life”, coastal fish and homing birds, land clouds, and wave defraction and refraction patterns. These diverse though predictable signs of a landmass could expand a small island into a sizable target or bridge island gaps in an archipelago, creating a large block to aim for. With a shift in focus to the nearfield, the wayfinder pieced together each island’s signature. Carefully, knowingly, the crew tracked the evening seabird flight paths and the directional streaks of transient deep phosphorescence.
That final destination, Dr. Colorado reminds us, is also a mindset. It is a way of seeing and being in balance with nature, gleaned from living a ceremonial life. Each wayfinding voyage, she points out, reminds us of our human potential to integrate analysis with intuition, and ritual with western science. “The greatest thing we can accomplish in our science and in our lives,” she concludes, “is to be in balance with the universe.”
Renewed interest in wayfinding presages a time when scientist and seaman alike are in balance and in open communication with nature. Recent voyages have proven that it can be done again. In Hawaii the Hokule’a has made three successful wayfinding voyages to Tahiti and back. The first was led by Mau Piailug, a traditional Polynesian navigator; the last two by Hawaiian Nainoa Thompson, one of the new breed of wayfinders. Na’ilima’s expedition, called “No Na Mamo” (For the Next Generation), symbolizes the intention of native peoples and organizations like the Indigenous Science Network, to share traditional knowledge. Other trips are planned. Canoes will gather from around the world on Vancouver Island in 1993 as native tribes convene to rekindle the art.
“We are still missing pieces of information”, says Dr. Colorado. “Some of the art remains hidden. Some may have been lost.” Or not yet found, at least by western culture. For we in the west may still not know how to ask the right questions or to understand the full meaning of each answer until our own minds begin to open and expand under the tutelage of elders and nature’s wise persistent teachings.
Author’s note–books cited or recommended: An Ocean in Mind by Will Kyselka; The Daughters of Copperwoman by Anne Cameron; and We the Navigators by David Lewis.
For more information on the Indigenous Science Network, contact Dr. Pamela Colorado, 573 Wainee St., Lahaina, Maui, Hawaii.
Karen Chandler, M.S., is a marine ecologist and co-founder of Adventure Spirit Maui, a company which specializes in ocean awareness and wilderness expeditions. P.O Box 3104, Waikoloa, Hawaii 96738.

Native Science Saves the Planet

Sacred Indian view of life may save planet, academics say
by Dana Flavelle
Toronto Star
They couldn’t be more unalike. Pam Colorado, small and dark, is a North American Indian who grew up in the wilderness learning the ancient ways of her people at her grandfather’s side.
David Peat, tall and pale, is an Englishman from Liverpool who spent his early childhood cultivating a passion for modern science.
But years later, as accomplished academics in very different fields, Colorado and Peat have found a bond in their mutual search for new ways to heal our troubled planet.
War, environmental disasters and the high cost of technologically based health care are a few of the problems that must be addressed in radically new ways, and quickly, they say.
“In my opinion, the problems facing the Earth are critical,” says Colorado, who is now a professor of social work and native studies at the University of Calgary.
“Conventional science has missed something,” says Peat, a physicist, author and consultant based in Ottawa. “It has given us an incredibly detailed map of the world, which is very useful. But it has had a lot of unpleasant side effects… deterioration of the ozone layer, global warming and things like that.”
To share their views, the pair were in Toronto to address a group of 30 other interested academics, environmentalists and futurists at a conference sponsored by the Institute for Cultural Affairs.
Providing forums for leading edge thinkers such as Colorado and Peat is one of the functions of the independent, non-profit institute.
The cause of many of the world’s problems is modern scientific thought, with its overly simplistic, mechanistic view of nature, Peat believes. Every time we try to fix one problem, we seem to create another.
Colorado thinks the solution may lie in the past, in what she calls “indigenous science.”
Put simply, indigenous science refers to the native people’s view that everything in the world is sacred and interconnected and, in many ways, beyond our control.
It’s a concept that, coincidentally, is in vogue among leading-edge Western scientists such as Peat, who have come to some of the same conclusions through the chaos theory of physics.
“It’s that sense that we’re all part of a great web of life in which everything plays a role and has to be respected,” Peat says.
Take the problem of acid rain, for example. The conventional approach is to pass laws limiting emissions from coal-fired hydroelectric plants. The indigenous approach might be to re-examine the lifestyle that creates the high demand for those plants in the first place.
“By looking at the world differently, you begin to change your values. You may become less concerned with the whole notion of progress,” Peat says.
He and Colorado are also trying to spread their ideas through the World Wide Indigenous Science Network, a group Colorado founded two years ago in Alberta. Intended to bridge the gap between modern Western and ancient native thinking, the network counts about 60 academics, business people and anyone else interested in healing the planet among its members.
Its lines of communication now reach as far as California, Mexico City, Hawaii, New Zealand, Nigeria, Australia, Thailand and the Philippines. By starting this dialogue between native and non-native people, Colorado hopes to create profound social and personal change around the world.
The notion that there might be an indigenous science with something positive to contribute to society came to her slowly and painfully.
For many years, while struggling up the academic ladder toward her PhD in social sciences, she worked hard at hiding the fact, even from herself, that she is Indian.
“As a native person, I was raised with the same myths and stereotypes you were: that we were stupid, primitive types and all we did was follow the animals around. I watched the Lone Ranger and Tonto and all that stuff growing up, so that was my idea of what being Indian meant.”
Suddenly, in the late ’70s, on the verge of finishing her thesis, she hit a roadblock. She couldn’t write the required outline for the last four chapters.
It took a year and half of agonizing over blank pages before she realized what was holding her back: A sacred native belief that you can never presume the outcome of any endeavor.
I’s like the Dene hunter who, faced with an empty larder, puts on his parka, packs up his gun and says: “I’m going for a walk.” He would never say “I’m going hunting.
“I realized then that we don’t just have different cultures, we native people have a science of our own, a way of coming to knowledge of our own… We go for a walk. We come prepared, we keep ourselves open… but it’s not up to us to decide what the conclusion will be.
“In a Western social scientific way I was being told to outline where you’re going and how you’re going to get there. It was exactly the opposite.”
That revelation marked the beginning for Colorado of a long journey back to embrace her native origins as an Oneida Indian and member of the Six Nations.
It has sometimes been painful. Watching the army and Quebec police battle it out with Mohawk Warriors over disputed Indian land in Oka this summer both saddened and terrified her.
Over the next few years, the indigenous science network is planning to stage three major events aimed at boosting public awareness of some of the problems the world is facing.
There will be a walk along an Inca trail, a trek across North America from Canada into Siberia and a voyage around the Pacific in ocean-going canoes, in each case following the routes taken by indigenous peoples centuries earlier.

6 January 2002 Letter: What Guides WISN?

Apela Colorado

272-2 Pualai St

Lahaina Maui, HI.

96761

6 Jan. ’02

Greetings return to you, Dr. colorado, in the love and in the light of the ancestors, The Source of Life.

Aloha Kakou!

The echo of the ancestors have resounded into these set of words:

The new world will be built upon the ruins of the old. The new structure will rise. Men of goodwill everywhere, under the guidance of WISN, will organize themselves into battalions of life, and their first major task must be the development of right human relations, through the education of the masses. This means the paralleling development of an enlightened public opinion, which is speaking esoterically right response to the sound which conveys the will of the CREATOR to the ears of the attentive. Then humanity will indeed move outward from the desert, leave the seas behind, and know that CREATOR is FIRE.

Kekaula, the SEER, is about that part of us that is ADEPT, knowing the world and how to work with forces in it. As such, ke kaula is a TRANSFORMER, able to bring about change, sometime surprisingly. Kekaula knows how to use his/her own ends and can be seen as a MANINPULATOR. In all, kekaula performs feats that few others can, and almost anyone would regard him/her as INGENIOUS.

Kekaula is composed primarily of the energy of PATIENCE and IMPULSE, and it dwells in the ancestral house of the FIRST CAUSE. Therefore, expressing “I AM” through the energies of IMAGINING and EXPERIENCING; and expression of the sea of dreams.

In this place, one experiences the beginning and ending of things- the spark, the idea. It is the NORTH, the unknowable, the MYSTERY. It is where all things come from, the unlimited potential of THE DREAMER. We swirl in all that can be, before and after it is real.

The expressions of the crossroads are Kekaula and keihoiho kukui (candle)

The keys to realization are in the hoailona of Ke komo kula (ring) and kaapu (the cup). The gateway to heaven is the lele (tower), where REFLECTION provides access and FOCUSING ATTENTION makes a way out.

Now: Kalua (hole, pit) is about being receptive. The approach is one of Openness to all that is around you, receptive life, ALLOWING PERCEPTION OF OTHER REALITIES beyond the everyday and normal.

These approaches in combination lead to seeing the simultaneity of life, the intermingling of cause and effect, the wholeness of the moment and the universe at large. Kalua symbolizes the gateways of “I FEEL” and “I PROJECT”. It is also the gate to and from the SEA OF MAGIC.

Here the mystery comes forth, just beneath the fabric of LIFE, a buoyant undercoat woven by the “FEELER”. Through the energy of INTERNALIZING, that which is latent congeals. We are not powerless and simply placed on earth; we feel the wonder within.

The crossroad of expressions are “MAHEALANI MOON” an “KEANIANI” (glass).

The keys to realization are in the MO’O and KEKAULA HAO (Chain). We are as strong as the weakest link.

The gate of the “HOLE” provide access through PERCEPTION OF OTHER REALITIES and exit through OPENNESS.

Now: No Ka Pua Loke La Kealoha- the ROSE, the flower of aloha, dwells in the ancestral house of the MATRIX and in the realization of “I WANT”. It represent the dilemma between what I want, how I want it and the way things just are. The challenge of the warriors is to realize the beauty of what is, and to be in step with the process of becoming.

Ka Pua Loke, the flower rose, is the question about perfection, about my inner sense of how things are supposed to be. When I a idealizing, I am in a fantasy  world of letter- perfection- according to me-. I can be a little more realistic.

Now, I am only PERFECTING. You could be better. Allow me to show you what is wrong. The trouble is inside me, I am not perfect. So, everything that is not perfect in me, I end up seeing as imperfection in the world, and in you.

I can choose to see all this another way. I can see the whole thing as UN-FOLDING, never quite perfect but always getting better. I can even see you in this new light. After all, you are dealing with your sense of perfection too.

Better yet, I can let go of the idea of my being perfect and relax into EXPRESSING who I am and how I like things to be. Just being can be its own perfection, even if it is beyond me. This way you get to be right too; within the sea of time and innocence.

In this sea, of time, we exist and experience. Duration leads to sequence, and we separate then from now, this from that, and you from me. Everybody wants to do something; we stir.

Here shines IMPULSE, “THE DOER.” He fills this place with the desire to experience. The crossroad of expressions are the PA KUKUI (WANDERER) and KE IPOAHI (THE LOVER). The keys to REALIZATIONS are in the APU (CUP) and KA PUA LOKE. The way in and out is through the GATE of the MIKILIMA (GLOVE) where PROJECTING IDENTITIES gains access and ACCEPTING ASSISTANCE creates an exit.

In this place, INNOCENCE, we still hear the voice of “THE SPEAKER”, that which sent us forth and which beckons us onward. Under the star of REACHING, we GROW and pursue living.

The crossroad of EXPRESSIONS are KE KEIKI (THE CHILD) and KE KUMU LA’AU (THE TREE). The keys of realization are through KA PUA LOKE (THE ROSE) and PAUKA (POWDER). Access and exit are through the gate of WAIPA’a (ICE), where clarity gets one in and CHANGEABILITY lets one out. Here we recall our inner guidance. The sea of Innocence is shared between the ancestral houses of “THE MATRIX” and “THE MOTION.”

Now: KOLOA, the DUCK, describes the part of ourselves that is CONVENTIONAL, going along with the way things are. To do so is to go with the grain, not against it, and so KOLOA symbolizes a kind of NATURALNESS, being in step.

It shows a SENSE OF HUMOR, that life does not have to be all seriousness. this same part of us can show SELF DOUBTS, a nagging about one’s own originality. It can also be SELF-EFFACING, doing things more for the sake of the team than for itself.

KOLOA is composed principally of the energy of LAUGH and INWARDNESS, and it dwells in the ancestral house of IMAIKALANI, the blind ali’i of Ka’u, THE SPIRIT INCARNATE. Therefore, KOLOA is expressing “I PROJECT” through the mana of EXTERNALIZING and INTERNALIZING; and expression of the sea of laughing hats.

In this sea are all lifes actors, each with permission to act out his or her role. “THE PLAYER”eggs us on. He encourages us to enjoy being on stage with his energy of EXTERNALIZING. We can be anything we choose, at least for a moment.

The crossroad of expressions are the LUA’APANA (JESTER) and KOLOA (DUCK). The keys of realization are through KE KAULA HAO (THE CHAIN) and the KIHEI (ROBE). Entry and exit are through the gateway of the IHE (SPEAR), where SELF EXPRESSION makes a way out. THE SEA OF LAUGHING HATS are shared with the ancestral houses, THE SPIRIT INCARNATE and THE ANCESTRAL GRAND PLAN.

The echo of the ancestors is complete, therefore, I leave you, Dr. Colorado, in the love and in the light of the ancestors, The Source of Life; rejoicing in the power and the peace braided with the cords of patience, revealing the power of the universe, your aloha.

Sincerely in service,

Hale Makua

HONO ELE MAKUA